Alcohol consumption and non-Hodgkin lymphoma survival PDF Print E-mail

J Cancer Surviv. 2009 Dec 29. [Epub ahead of print]

Alcohol consumption and non-Hodgkin lymphoma survival.

Han X, Zheng T, Foss FM, Ma S, Holford TR, Boyle P, Leaderer B, Zhao P, Dai M, Zhang Y. School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA.

INTRODUCTION: Epidemiological studies have shown that moderate alcohol drinkers have a lower death rate for all causes. Alcohol drinking has also been associated with reduced risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Here, we examined the role of alcohol consumption on NHL survival by type of alcohol consumed and NHL subtype. METHODS: A cohort of 575 female NHL incident cases diagnosed during 1996-2000 in Connecticut was followed-up for a median of 7.75 years. Demographic, clinical, and lifestyle information was collected at diagnosis. Survival analyses were conducted with Kaplan-Meier methods, and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated from Cox Proportional Hazards models. RESULTS: Compared to never drinkers, wine drinkers experienced better overall survival (75% vs. 69% five-year survival rates, p-value for log-rank test = 0.030) and better disease free survival (70% vs. 67% five-year disease-free survival rates, p-value for log-rank test = 0.049). Analysis by NHL subtype shows that the favorable effect of wine consumption was mainly seen for patients diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (wine drinkers for more than 25 years vs. never drinkers: HR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.94 for overall survival; HR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.16-0.94 for disease-free survival), and the adverse effect of liquor consumption was also observed among DLBCL patients (liquor drinkers vs. never drinkers: HR=2.49, 95% CI 1.26-4.93 for disease-free survival). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a moderate relationship between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and NHL survival, particularly for DLBCL. The results need to be replicated in larger studies. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Pre-diagnostic behaviors might impact the prognosis and survival of NHL patients.

PMID: 20039144 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

 

 

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